Tag Archive: logic



This argument occurred to me last night and it isn’t well fleshed out — it’s merely a skeleton of an idea. It is a reason why religion doesn’t make sense which I have never heard — though, no doubt, someone has come up with this idea or something very similar.

So, this is where you come in. Since this idea is not completely formed, I’d like some criticism or additions to the idea to make it more understandable and sensible. Or, reassurance that it already makes sense 🙂

So here it is:

I’ve often heard the same response from a believer, when someone says, “Isn’t it a coincidence that most people believe in the same God as their parents?” The response: “You don’t realize that a lot of people actually change their religions as they come to understand the world better.”

Ok, leaving aside the questionable reference to “a lot of people,” this statement still seems to actually be evidence against God, not for God.

Why? Because if there were an absolutely correct religion, why would finding that religion be up to the capricious nature of humans?

There are many much less important things in the world that are not left to capricious thinking. We all know that humans normally have two arms. We all know that eating certain things can kill us. There is no wiggle room on these mundane things. If someone isn’t born with two arms we consider that a genetic or developmental error. If someone thinks that eating cyanide is healthy, that is a judgement error.

Yet, if someone changes their mind from believing that Christianity is the one true religion to believing that Hinduism is the one true religion — or, more importantly vice versa, which thereby nullifies the possibility of either change being correct — it is not considered an error.

Again, I’m not sure if this is a fully formed argument or if I’m just restating an argument made by someone else in different words. Any criticism appreciated 🙂

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ImagePreviously, I wrote a blog entry about an unfair “out” that believers have when they explain how something happened: “God did it.”

However, that is not the only trick up the believer’s sleeve. There is also the situation in which something does happen, but which an all-powerful, all-knowing, all-loving God would not want to happen. Polio, floods, wars, drug wars, genocides, rapes, slavery, psychopathy, psychopathic killers, torture, child molestation, other religions existing, atheism, errors or contradictions in the Bible/Koran/Torah/etc., animal cruelty: the list goes on.

Why would God allow these things to exist? They do not help the case for religion in the slightest. However, a quick rejoinder solves all this: “God works in mysterious ways.”

Ah, yes! The “get out of jail free card” of religion. It works for anything that conflicts with one’s particular religious beliefs.

This is, however, not as great a solution as one might think. Why? Consider this.

After 9/11, many people might have said, “How could Osama Bin Laden have planned such a terrible act?”

Well, the answer would be simple, wouldn’t it? “Osama Bin Laden works in mysterious ways!”

“Oh, no! No, no, no! This cannot be applied to anything other than God, that’s not fair!” one might say.

Well, that’s partially correct, at least. It isn’t fair because it isn’t a fair argument.

It is an unfalsifiable statement. Although unfalsifiable sounds great (as in, “Wow! It can’t be falsified! It must be true!); unfalsifiability is not a measure of a statement’s strength, it’s actually a demonstration of it’s weakness, for precisely the same reason why it can be used to legitimize Bin Laden, or any other terrible act, for that matter. It can be applied to anything and still work. If something is true, it needs to have a method for testing it’s truth — an unfalsifiable statement cannot be tested and is therefore not a fair statement, logically.

If religious people can use “God works in mysterious ways,” then everyone can use “x works in mysterious ways” to prove anything. This is obviously not an effective way at getting to the truth in any matter, so the only other option is for nobody to use this manner of arguing. God does not work in mysterious ways: unfalsifiable statements work in mysterious ways.


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Well, of course the answer is, “No.” But, time and time again, the belief that “Atheism is a religion too” is reasserted. Let’s break this down, shall we?

First of all, the etymology of the word. The word is composed of two parts: “a-” and “theism”. “A-” meaning “not” or “against” or “without” (all of which would work in this circumstance), and “theism” meaning a belief in a God or gods. Therefore, atheism means without a belief in God or gods.

However, this is generally not enough for people who seriously believe that atheism is a religion, just as Christianity or Islam is a religion. Fair enough. I’ll provide more evidence.

Not all religions have holy books, this is true; however, it tends to be the religious people associated with the Abrahamic religions (all of which have holy books), who make the claim that atheism is a religion. Needless to say, there is no dogma of atheism. There is no holy book, or even a book that atheists should follow. There are many kinds of atheists, some who believe in some forms of spirituality, some who believe in some superstitions, some who believe in conspiracy theories, and the some who believe only in things based on scientific evidence (I align myself in the last category). Christians, on the contrary, are not allowed to follow many superstitions because their holy book prohibits these beliefs. There are many kinds of Christians, but they all must base their beliefs on the Bible, otherwise, they are no longer a Christian. There is no “Bible” or “Koran” for atheists to follow.

Further, there are no rituals or gestures or duties of an atheist. With the example of Christianity, rituals include going to church or spreading the gospel. Gestures include making the cross for good luck. Duties include reading the bible, defending Christianity, and aligning your life in accordance with the Bible. Now, just because you don’t do any of these aforementioned examples, does not prove your point. These are merely examples. You will probably have your own rituals, gestures or duties in your interpretation of Christianity. If you have none of these, I question whether you are actually a true Christian. In other words, if there’s nothing you need to do to be a Christian, then I could easily call myself a Christian too. This is a very weak form of Christianity, if this is your position.

Not enough evidence? Fine. Let’s use logic.

I claim that I don’t believe in any religious belief. A believer may say, “But you BELIEVE in atheism.” Well, let me blow your minds right now. Get ready. Here it comes. I can respond that, “Whatever you think is ‘atheism as a religious belief,’ well, I don’t believe in that either. I believe in NO religious belief.” You may try to come back with, “Your unbelief is a kind of belief!” which is an incredibly contradictory statement. Ok, if you are allowed to make statements of this sort, then so am I. I can respond that, “I don’t believe in the unbelief of belief and I don’t believe in any belief.” We are starting to see a pattern here. A nonsensical verbal repartee that will go on ad infinitum. This is not the way to win an argument. This mode of reasoning can never prove atheism to be a religion. Generally, atheists are unwilling to respond to nonsense with nonsense; however, I feel it is useful here to demonstrate what believers are doing when they state that unbelief is a form of belief.

Why then, do people persist in claiming that atheism is a religion? My guess is because they know, deep-down, that having beliefs founded on faith is a weak foundation. As a result, these people want to believe that everyone has a weak foundation for their beliefs. If this is true, it is a lot of wasted energy on behalf of the people making the “atheism is a religion” claim. They should be more humble and admit that other people might have a stronger foundation for their beliefs, and spend their energy in more productive ways.

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